Practitioners

Already Registered

Your legal responsibilities as a practitioner

As a registered health practitioner, you have certain responsibilities under the Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act 2003.

Consumer rights

You must:

We strongly recommend that you:

  • Display your annual practising certificate prominently in your practice
  • Notify the Registrar in writing if you believe that another health practitioner poses a risk of harm to the public by practising below the required standard of competence
  • Assist in the regulation of your profession; for example by participating in professional conduct committees or competence review committees when asked to do so.

Chiropractic operates in a private practice environment so we depend on the active participation of the professions for this process to be effective.

Your ethical responsibilities as a practitioner a

As well as your legal responsibilities, you also have ethical responsibilities as a health practitioner.   The Board’s Code of Ethics sets out the core ethical principles you must observe.

Ethical standards are principles of professional conduct that you must meet to fulfil your duty to patients, the public and to your colleagues. They guide attitude and behaviour and as such they extend beyond professional skills and technical competence. The ethical standards you are expected to observe often exceed your legal obligations.

These principles also provide a guide to the public to determine reasonable expectations from practitioners. 

Do you have specific concerns about another chiropractor?

If you have concerns about the performance of a colleague, consider the following:

  • Was there a one-off incident that concerns you, or does there appear to be a pattern of poor performance emerging?
  • Have you talked to the chiropractor about your concerns?
  • Was it a one-off incident or a serious departure from accepted chiropractic practise? 
  • Did the chiropractor have an acceptable explanation for this departure?
  • Has there recently been a change in the chiropractor’s behaviour or ability? If so, you may want to consider the possibility of a health issue impacting on their ability to perform. 

If you raise your concerns with us, please note that any information you provide must come with your consent to send onto the Chiropractor for their comment, as per the principles of natural justice.

Competence

You must:

  • Notify the Registrar immediately if you employ a health practitioner who resigns or is dismissed from their employment for reasons relating to competence.

  • Comply with any orders that the Council may make following a review of your competence.

  • Comply with the requirements of any competence programme that we may set [(section 40)]. 

  • Allow us to inspect all or any of your clinical records for the purpose of a competence review, competence programme or recertification programme.

  • http://www.chiropracticboard.org.nz/Publications/Competency-Standards/

Health concerns

You must:

  • Promptly notify the Registrar if you have reason to believe that another practitioner is unable to perform the functions required for the practice of chiropractic because of some mental or physical condition.

Annual Practicing Certificate

You must:

  • Not practise without a current annual practising certificate (APC).
  • Provide the information determined by us when applying for an APC along with the relevant fee.

CPD programme

You must meet the requirements of the recertification programme set out in the Board’s CPD Policy under section 41 of the Act. This requires you to complete the specified number of hours of continuing professional development (CPD) and peer contact activities specified for your profession over a two-year cycle.  http://www.chiropracticboard.org.nz/Login

Information on the Register

You must:

  • Inform us of the current postal address, residential address and (if applicable) work address, and promptly advise us of any changes in your address.
  • Advise us of any changes in your name within one month.

Scopes of practice

You must:

  • Not practise outside the scope of practice in which you are registered.
  • Not describe yourself as or imply that you are a health practitioner of a particular kind unless you are registered and qualified to be a practitioner of that kind. For example, if you are registered as a chiropractor, you may not describe yourself as, or imply that you are, a particular kind of chiropractic specialist, unless you are registered in a scope of practice for the specialty concerned.
  • Comply with any conditions that the Chiropractic Board may place on your scope of practice.